Key Stage One Workshops

Meet the Castle household and Squire

This two-part workshop includes meeting characters from the past, enthralling story telling and hands-on activities.

The Lady of the Castle will make an appearance to welcome her guests, where she will be accompanied by her servant and the Castle Marshall.

Each character will tell tales about what their life is like for them– each story will be very different due to their place in Tamworth Castle!

Youngsters will get to hear what daily life is like for each – and also be told what life was like for children.

Significant events from history will be talked about while the lady’s visitors will gain an insight into Castle life, what different household objects are and features of the building. The toilet always proves popular!

There will be a range of activities for children to get involved with while they are closely supervised by the Lady of the Castle, the Servant and also the Castle Marshall. Our new workers will help the servant with some of her duties, help to dress a knight for battle and take part in a knight’s bill and marching drill.

Information
Total cost per child: £5.50 (including admission)
Sessions: last for one hour twenty minutes per group
Availability: All year round subject to availability
Curriculum links
What were homes like long ago
What were castle like a long time ago
Innovating with history – eight ways of introducing pupils to historical interpretation

 

The Great Fire of London

meet the Stuart household’ session covers similar themes as ‘Meet the Castle household’ but focuses specifically on the Great Fire of London. An additional theme of The Plague is also available on request.

Information
Total cost per child: £5.00 (including admission)
Sessions: last for one hour twenty minutes per group
Availability: All year round subject to availability
Curriculum links
What were homes like long ago
What were castle like a long time ago
Innovating with history – eight ways of introducing pupils to historical interpretation

 

Old toys

Our fascinating Victorian nursery - with its display of toys from the museum's collection – is the unique starting point for this session, as take a look back in time as to how children played years ago.

Children will get the chance to explore modern replicas of traditional moving toys, investigate the variety of materials which were used in the past - and how they compare
with the materials we use today.

This session includes Thaumatrope making, a chance for your group to make a fun Victorian optical toy after they have taken part in the old toys handling session.

Information
Total cost per child: £5.00 (including admission)
Sessions: last for 45 minutes to one hour per group
Availability: All year round subject to availability
Curriculum links
How are toys different from those in the past?
Children in Victorian Britain
Moving pictures
Puppets
Moving toys

 

Meet the Victorians

This fascinating two-part storytelling session will see pupils meet and find out more about the lives of Victorians living in Tamworth Castle.

In the first session, the housemaid will describe just what life was like for a servant working at the Castle. Children will get the chance to help out with some of their duties, to give a real flavour of Victorian life.

During the second session, the family governess will explain in detail what life was like for the rich men, women and children living in the Castle. There will be the opportunity to try on Victorian costumes and discover how rich Victorian children were educated.

Both sessions include participation in period activities, handling original artefacts and learning through living history and storytelling.

Information
Total cost per child: £5.00 (including admission)
Sessions: One hour twenty minutes per group
Availability: All year round subject to availability
Curriculum links
History: What were homes like long ago?
History: What were castles like a long time ago
Innovating with history – eight ways of introducing pupils to historical interpretation
History: Children in Victorian Britain